Past Events - Center for the Arts and Humanities

Past Events

April 4, 2022

The Good Place Viewing Party
Creator Michael Schur in conversation with Professor Lydia Moland
6:30 p.m., Diamond 122

Michael Schur, legendary television creator of “The Good Place” and “Parks and Recreation” has written a book on moral philosophy! It’s called How to Be Perfect: The Correct Answer to Every Moral Question, and Colby philosophy professor Lydia Moland will be interviewing him about it on April 4 at CitySpace in Boston.

The Philosophy Department and the Center for the Arts and the Humanities are sponsoring a viewing party to watch their interview live.

March 29, 2022

Two Cent Talks Series
Ira Sadoff and Gerry Boyle
5:00 p.m., Greene Block + Studios

Ira Sadoff is the prize-winning author of nine collections of poetry, most recently the novel Country Living, the Ira Sadoff Reader, and History Matters: Contemporary Poetry on the Margins of American Culture. He has published more than three hundred poems, stories and essays in magazines.
 
Gerry Boyle is the author of 15 crime novels, including the acclaimed Jack McMorrow mystery series. His latest McMorrow novel, Randon Act, was awarded the 2020 Maine Literary Award for crime fiction, the second time a McMorrow novel has been chosen for that honor. 
 

The Two Cent Talks Series is sponsored by Colby College’s Office of the President, Center for the Arts and the Humanities, Cultural Events Committee, English Department, and Creative Writing Program

March 19 + 20, 2022

Winged Migration
Cinema Explorations
10:00 a.m., Railroad Square Cinema

This innovative, spectacular film does not just tell the when, where, and how migratory birds range over the globe or even just show these creatures in flight, it takes us along on their magnificent journeys. With cinematography delivered by novel, miniaturized cameras, hot air balloons, and ultralight aircraft, we gain an incredible point of view from inside the flock, flying alongside other birds. We are proud and pleased to be able to bring this classic back to the big screen where it can be best appreciated. If you have not seen it, be sure to come on Saturday because you will want to see it again on Sunday!

Cinema Explorations is sponsored by the Center for the Arts and Humanities. This series is free and open to the public.

March 16, 2022

Drugs, Death, and Doctors: Injecting Humanity into Medical Ethics
Bridgit Durkin
4:00 p.m., Diamond 122

Physician and medical ethicist Bridget Durkin explores the interplay among racial prejudice, patient care, and the medical system through her experiences working in Camden, NJ, during the current fentanyl crisis and the ICU during the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Durkin will discuss how her training as a classicist and performing artist informs her clinical approach to addiction and end of life care. Her work invites exploration of how the arts and humanities can uplift the practice of modern medicine.
Sponsored by the Center for the Arts and Humanities, 2021-2024 Public Humanistic Inquiry Lab, the Department of Classics and Performance, Theater and Dance.

March 12 + 13, 2022

Wife of spy
Cinema Explorations
10:00 a.m., Railroad Square Cinema

Master filmmaker Kiyoshi Kurosawa (unrelated to Akira Kurosawa) won the Silver Lion (Best Director) at the 2020 Venice Film Festival for this riveting, gorgeously crafted Hitchcockian thriller. The year is 1940 on the eve of World War II. Import-export merchant and amateur filmmaker Yusaku, played by Issey Takahashi (KILL BILL), senses his nation is on a disturbing path. After a trip to Manchuria, he is determined to expose what he witnessed there and secretly filmed. Meanwhile, his wife Satoko (award-winner Yû Aoi) is visited by her childhood friend—now a military policeman. He warns her that Yusaku is under suspicion of working with Japan’s enemies and reveals that a woman her husband brought back from his trip has died. Satoko confronts Yusaku, but soon finds herself torn among loyalty to her husband, the life they have built, the country they call home, and a moral universe that exceeds national boundaries.

Cinema Explorations is sponsored by the Center for the Arts and Humanities. This series is free and open to the public.

March 10, 2022

Indigenous Perspectives on Artificial Intelligence             
4:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

Join the Critical Indigenous Studies Initiative for a discussion with prominent artists and scholars who mobilize, disrupt, and theorize AI through Indignous epistemologies and lived experiences. Jason Edward Lewis, Noelani Arista, Archer Pechawis, and Suzanne Kite will join us for a roundtable discussion of their recent work, moderated by Willi Lempert and Colby student Kale Sapiel. Followed by a Q&A with attendees. 

Sponsored by the American Studies Department, the Center for the Arts and Humanities, Davis AI Institute, Oak Institute for Human Rights, Art Department, Environmental Studies Department, Cinema Studies Department, Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies Department, and the Science, Technology, and Society Program. 

Have 30 minutes for some engaging reading? We highly recommend that you check out the panelists’ co-authored piece “Making Kin with the Machines” before the roundtable.

March 7, 2022

Honorée Fanonne Jeffers
6:30 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

Join us for a conversation with the award-winning poet, essayist, and novelist Honorée Fanonne Jeffers as she discusses her two most recent books, The Age of Phillis (2020) and The Love Songs of W.E.B. DuBois (2021). Honorée Fanonne Jeffers is the author of five critically acclaimed books of poetry. Honorée has won fellowships from the American Antiquarian Society, the Aspen Summer Words Conference, the Bread Loaf Writers Conference, the MacDowell Colony, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Rona Jaffe Foundation, the Vermont Studio Center, and the Witter Bynner Foundation through the Library of Congress. In consideration of Honorée’s scholarly research on Phillis Wheatley Peters, she was elected to the American Antiquarian Society, a learned organization to which fourteen U.S. Presidents have been elected. She has won the 2018 Harper Lee Award for Literary Distinction, and in 2020, she was inducted into the Alabama Writers Hall of Fame; both notations recognize lifetime achievement.

Sponsored by the Center for the Arts and Humanities, The Margaret T McFadden Fund for Humanistic Inquiry, Cultural Events Committee, and the Oak Institute for Human Rights.

February 26 +27, 2022

After Antarctica
Cinema Explorations
10:00 a.m., Railroad Square Cinema

We follow polar explorer Will Steger’s life journey as an eyewitness to the profound changes to the polar regions. In 1989, Steger led an international team of six scientists and explorers on the first coast-to-coast dogsled traverse of Antarctica. The expedition’s mission was to draw global attention to Antarctica’s changing climate and to renew the Antarctic Treaty protecting the continent from mineral exploitation. Despite his scientific training and awareness of climate change, Steger never expected what he would soon discover. This arduous expedition opened his eyes to the most pressing issue of our time and changed the course of his life forever. Thirty years later, Steger is on the ice once again at the opposite end of the Earth recounting both a lifetime of exploration and the life-changing journey that led him to where he is today. 

Cinema Explorations is sponsored by the Center for the Arts and Humanities. This series is free and open to the public.

February 15, 2022

Geoff Burrows
Senior Program Officer, Division of Research, National Endowment for the Humanities
4:00 p.m., Live Zoom Workshop

Please join us for this workshop with Geoff Burrows.  He is a Senior Program Officer in the Division of Research for the National Endowment for the Humanities, where he works with Fellowship Programs at Independent Research Institutions. Geoff will talk about NEH programs and initiatives and give 30 minutes of application-writing tips and strategies. In addition, there will be time for Q & A. 
 
A historian of Latin America, the Caribbean, and the United States, Geoff holds a Ph.D. from the CUNY Graduate Center, an MA from Hunter College, and a BA from UC Berkeley. Prior to coming to NEH, he taught at Seton Hall University, Queens College, Hunter College, and the College of Staten Island.

February 12 +13, 2022

How They Got Over 
Cinema Explorations
10:00 a.m., Railroad Square Cinema

Black gospel quartet music served as the bedrock for the mid-twentieth-century rock ‘n’ roll boom and helped break down racial walls across America. The film showcases the history of how Black gospel quartets traveled America, innovating new musical and performance styles that would influence a host of rock ‘n’ rollers for decades to come, and giving rise to performers like Sam Cooke, Lou Rawls, and Wilson Pickett. Featuring classic performance footage and interviews with some of the greatest names in gospel quartet music from the 1920s through the 1950s, the film celebrates the spirit of these performers who helped usher in a musical revolution that changed the world forever.

Cinema Explorations is sponsored by the Center for the Arts and Humanities. This series is free and open to the public.

February 5 +6, 2022

Luzzo
Cinema Explorations
10:00 a.m., Railroad Square Cinema

 Jesmark is a hard-working Maltese fisherman facing an agonizing moral choice. He can repair his leaky luzzu—a colorful, traditional wooden fishing boat—in the hope of eking out a meager living for his wife and newborn son as his father and grandfather did before him or he can find the money to pay for his son’s medical needs. He could decommission his boat in exchange for a payout from the European Union and find something else to do. He has skills valued in a business with people on both sides of the law and facing environmental challenges. 

Cinema Explorations is sponsored by the Center for the Arts and Humanities. This series is free and open to the public.

Cinema Explorations is sponsored by the Center for the Arts and Humanities. This series is free and open to the public.

February 3, 2022

Looking After: Conversations on Art and Healing
Picturing the COVID-19 Pandemic with Sria Chatterjee, James Clar, Guadalupe Maravilla, Stephanie Misa, Suzanne Hudson, and Tanya Sheehan

 

Sria Chatterjee, James Clar, Guadalupe Maravilla, and Stephanie Misa join Suzanne Hudson and Tanya Sheehan for the first installment of our series Looking After: Conversations on Art and Healing. We conclude with a poetry reading by Tess Taylor.

This series is sponsored by the Center for the Arts and Humanities and USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences and produced by The Brooklyn Rail.

January 15-16, 2022

Truth Tellers
Cinema Explorations
10:00 a.m., Railroad Square Cinema

 

This new documentary film chronicles the lives of courageous Americans fighting for peace, racial equity, environmental justice, and indigenous rights through the eyes of Robert Shetterly. A long-time activist and artist, Shetterly has painted 250 portraits of such Americans, past and present. The film explores the intersections among issues of social, environmental, and economic fairness, stressing the urgency to confront them and provide a history lesson in what it means to be a citizen of a democracy.

Cinema Explorations is sponsored by the Center for the Arts and Humanities. This series is free and open to the public.

January 8-9, 2022

Those Who Remained
Cinema Explorations
10:00 a.m., Railroad Square Cinema

Director Barnabás Tóth tells a beautiful, lyrical story showing survivors healing in post-war Hungary. Teenaged Klara desperately hopes her father and mother will come home. A camp survivor and—like Klara—bereft of family, Aldo resumes working as a doctor. After an appointment, the teen and the doctor find a salve—the tissue of family—for their wounds. 

Cinema Explorations is sponsored by the Center for the Arts and Humanities. This series is free and open to the public.

November 19-20, 2021

Elm City Press Fest
Greene Block + Studios
18 Main Street, Waterville< Maine

Elm City Small Press Fest is a community event that focuses on independent publishing in the Maine region. The event highlights contemporary print and publishing culture while activating conversations around creative labor and commerce as viable artistic practices. The goal of the fest is to inform attendees of contemporary creative publishing while stimulating and promoting creative economies in the area. 

Sponsored by Greene Block + Studios, Center for the Arts and Humanities, Colby College Libraries, and the Lunder Institute.

November 18, 2021

Freedom, Captivity, and Human Rights
A conversation with Zo Orchingwa ’14
6:00 p.m., Parker-Reed, Schair-Swenson-Watson Alumni Center

The Center for the Arts and Humanities and the Oak Institute for Human Rights are cosponsoring the second event in our Freedom, Captivity, and Human Rights Alumni Series.

Professor of Philosophy Jill Gordon will host a conversation with Zo Orchingwa ’14 about Ameelio, his nonprofit app that transforms America’s correctional system by connecting incarcerated people with support networks, reducing recidivism and prison populations. 

All Light, Everywhere (2021)

November 16, 2021

All Light, Everywhere (2021)
Cinema in Conversation: Films of Freedom, Captivity, and Human Rights
7:00 p.m., Maine Film Center

The film follows the biases inherent to the way humans physically see the world, focusing primarily on the usage of police body cameras and other forms of police surveillance, but also tracing studies of solar eclipses as well as the parallel development of automatic weapons with the motion picture camera.

Cosponsored by the Center for the Arts and Humanities, Oak Institute for Human Rights, Cinema Studies, and the Maine Film Center.

November 16, 2021

Two Cent Talks Series
An Evening of Original Hip Hop featuring Maine’s Graphic Melee and Word’s of Phrase, accompanied by Liza May
5:00 p.m., Greene Block + Studios

Graphic Melee is an emcee, producer, DJ, and audio engineer dedicated to heavy beats, dusty vinyl, and dirty synthesizers. He is the resident DJ for Portland’s Monday of The Minds, Maine’s only Hip-Hop showcase for local and national touring acts. He is the curator of Todayinhiphophistory.com, a blog with 130k+ followers, and a multi-instrumentalist Berklee graduate with decades of experience in various genres. He has performed extensively throughout the Northeast U.S. and toured the East Coast, sharing the stage with numerous artists including Onyx, Kool Keith, George Porter Jr. (The Meters), Lyrics Born, Sage Francis, Blueprint, and Zion I. Words of Phrase, now of Portland, moved to Waterville in his teens. His solo albums are Core-Tex: The Cerebral Sessions and A Curse Called Passion. His most recent work, Humbly Worded, was produced by Jay Humble, also of Portland.  A professional dancer, Liza May enjoys sharing her love for movement through a combination of hip-hip, modern, African & flow/fire dance. 

This event is part of the Two Cents Talk Series, and is sponsored by Colby College’s Office of the President, Center for the Arts and the Humanities, Cultural Events Committee, English Department, and Creative Writing Program.
Abolition for the 21st Century

November 15, 2021

Gender, Feminism, and Abolition
Victoria Law
Freedom and Captivity lecture series
7:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

A workshop with journalist Victoria Law, who is an American anarchist activist, prison abolitionist, writer, freelance editor, and photographer.

The Freedom and Captivity lecture series is sponsored by the Departments of American Studies, Anthropology, Art, English and Creative Writing, Music, Philosophy, Sociology, Theater and Dance, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, the African American Studies program, the Oak Institute for Human Rights, Colby Libraries, and the Cultural Events Committee.

Un Prophète (2009)

November 9, 2021

Un Prophète (2009)
Cinema in Conversation: Films of Freedom, Captivity, and Human Rights
7:00 p.m., Maine Film Center

A Prophet (French: Un Prophète) is a 2009 French prison crime film directed by Jacques Audiard with a screenplay by Audiard, with Thomas Bidegain, Abdel Raouf Dafri, and Nicolas Peufaillit, from a story by Dafri. The film stars Tahar Rahim in the title role as an imprisoned petty criminal of Algerian origins who rises in the inmate hierarchy, becoming an assassin and drug trafficker as he initiates himself into the Corsican and then Muslim subcultures.

Cosponsored by the Center for the Arts and Humanities, Oak Institute for Human Rights, Cinema Studies, and the Maine Film Center.

November 9, 2021

All We Can Save: Truth, Courage, and Solutions for the Climate Crisis
Ayana Elizabeth Johnson, Ph.D.
7:00 p.m., Zoom Webinar

Dr. Ayana Elizabeth Johnson is a marine biologist, policy expert, writer, and Brooklyn native. She is founder of Urban Ocean Lab, a think tank for coastal cities, and co-creator and co-host of the Spotify/Gimlet podcast How to Save a Planet. With Dr. Katharine Wilkinson, she co-edited the climate anthology All We Can Save, and co-founded The All We Can Save Project. Recently, she co-authored the Blue New Deal, a roadmap for including the ocean in climate policy. Previously, she was executive director of the Waitt Institute, developed policy at the EPA and NOAA, served as a leader of the March for Science, and taught as an adjunct professor at New York University. Dr. Johnson earned a BA from Harvard University in environmental science and public policy, and a Ph.D. from Scripps Institution of Oceanography in marine biology. She publishes widely, including in The New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, and Time, and she blogs on Scientific American. She is on the 2021 Time 100 Next List and was named one of Elle’s 27 Women Leading on Climate. Outside Magazine called her “the most influential marine biologist of our time.” Her mission is to build community around solutions to our climate crisis. Find her @ayanaeliza.

Cosponsored by Environmental Studies, the Center for the Arts and the Humanities, the Goldfarb Center for Public Policy,  and the Oak Institute for Human Rights.

Freedom and Captivity

November 8, 2021

Solitary Confinement
Lisa Guenther and jackie sumell
Freedom and Captivity lecture series
7:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

A conversation between philosopher Lisa Guenther (Queens University) and artist jackie sumell.

The Freedom and Captivity lecture series is sponsored by the Departments of American Studies, Anthropology, Art, English and Creative Writing, Music, Philosophy, Sociology, Theater and Dance, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, the African American Studies program, the Oak Institute for Human Rights, Colby Libraries, and the Cultural Events Committee.

Medical Humanities and Artificial Intelligence: A Critical Nexus for Data Ethics and Racial Equity

November 3, 2021

Medical Humanities and Artificial Intelligence: A Critical Nexus for
Data Ethics and Racial Equity
Kirsten Ostherr
6:00 p.m., Page Commons

Artificial intelligence (AI) is being used in a wide range of healthcare settings, often without patients’ (or even doctors’) awareness, and with little transparency or ethics oversight. This recent addition to the technological armamentarium of medicine has given rise to concerns about algorithmic bias and has prompted debates about the changing role of human clinicians in the evolving ecosystems of digital health. Yet, some researchers have argued that AI will augment the capacities of physicians and increase their availability to provide empathy and other uniquely human forms of care to their patients. This talk will explore several concrete examples of AI use in healthcare, with a focus on social determinants of health and racial equity. Prof. Ostherr will explore the questions: What would it take for AI to be “ethical,” in a society that is still shaped by racial discrimination and disparate access to care? What methods can medical and health humanities provide to help create a more humane and just healthcare future? And, how might we reimagine health technology with ethics and equality truly at the center of the design process?

Cosponsored by the Medicine and Race Public Humanistic Inquiry Lab, the Departments of Anthropology and Sociology, the Science, Technology and Society Program, and the Davis Institute for Artificial Intelligence.

October 29-30, 2021

Fall Shabbaton with Elana Arian

6:30 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

The Fall Shabbaton is an annual event that brings together the Maine Jewish community and friends from farther afield for a weekend of Torah study, soulful music, Shabbat meals, and invigorating connection. What started out as  a Friday-night dinner and concert has evolved into a full Shabbat of learning and singing, with intergenerational programs for college students, children and teens, synagogue members from across the state. Past guests have included Nefesh Mountain, Deborah Sacks Mintz, Neshama Carlebach and the Glory to God gospel singers, and Joey Weisenberg, as well as Talmud scholar Ruth Calderon. The Shabbaton has grown into a partner program to the Maine Conference for Jewish Life, sustaining our community with Jewish learning and music as we enter the winter months. 

Cosponsored with the Center for Small Town Jewish Life.

Safe

October 27, 2021

Safe (2015) with Steve Wurtzler, Colby Cinema Studies
Cinema in Conversation: Films of Freedom, Captivity, and Human Rights
7:00 p.m., Maine Film Center

Safe is a 1995 British-American psychological drama film written and directed by Todd Haynes and starring Julianne Moore. Set in 1987, it follows a suburban housewife in Los Angeles whose monotonous life is abruptly changed when she becomes sick with a mysterious illness caused by the environment around her. The film topped the “best film of the 1990s” poll by The Village Voice, and was described by critics as “the scariest film of the year”, “a mesmerizing horror movie”, and “a work of feminist counter-cinema”. 20 years after the film’s release, Haynes said its themes—disease and immunity in a post-industrial landscape and how recovery is a burden often put on victims of illness—were even more relevant than they were when the film was released.

Cosponsored by the Center for the Arts and Humanities, the Oak Institute for Human Rights, Cinema Studies, and the Maine Film Center.

Freedom and Captivity

October 26, 2021

Visualizing Incarceration
Sean Kelley, Brett Story, and Rowan Renee
Freedom and Captivity lecture series
7:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

A conversation with curator Sean Kelley (Eastern State Penitentiary), filmmaker and author Brett Story (Prison in 12 Landscapes; Prison Nation), and artist Rowan Renee.

The Freedom and Captivity lecture series is sponsored by the Departments of American Studies, Anthropology, Art, English and Creative Writing, Music, Philosophy, Sociology, Theater and Dance, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, the African American Studies program, the Oak Institute for Human Rights, Colby Libraries, and the Cultural Events Committee.

October 25, 2021

Freedom and Captivity on the Border:  A conversation with Amber Ramirez ’14
7:00 p.m., Chace Community Forum

The Center for the Arts and Humanities and the Oak Institute for Human Rights are cosponsoring the first event in our Freedom, Captivity, and Human Rights Alumni Series. Assistant Professor of Spanish Nicolás Ramos Flores will host a conversation with Amber Ramirez ‘14, who will be speaking about life on the El Paso/Juárez border, her translation work since graduation, and her legal advocacy for detainees and asylum seekers.

Please note, this event is open only to the Colby Community.

Sponsored by the Center for the Arts and Humanities and the Oak Institute for Human Rights.

October 14, 2021

Keynote Event on Wabanaki Place Names
Penobscot Tribal Historian James Francis, Moderated by Darren Ranco

7:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

During the event, James Francis will discuss his important work on returning Wabanaki place names to locations in Maine. There will be ample time for discussion, in a Q&A moderated by Penobscot scholar Darren Ranco. This event is part of the Critical Indigenous Studies Initiative’s Indigenous Peoples’ Day Event Series 2021, in partnership with the University of Maine’s Native American Programs.

Sponsored by the American Studies Program’s Critical Indigenous Studies Initiative, Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies Program, Environmental Studies Program, History Department, Oak Institute for Human Rights, Theater and Dance Department, Center for the Arts and Humanities, and the University of Maine’s Native American Programs.

Freedom and Captivity

October 11, 2021

Reparations as Black Antagonism
Cameron Rowland
Freedom and Captivity lecture series
7:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

Performance and talk by artist Cameron Rowland. Cameron Rowland is an American artist. Rowland graduated from Wesleyan University with a BA in 2011, and after being awarded the MacArthur Fellowship returned there to address the student body. He spoke about his 2018 work Depreciation that critically examined the economics of slavery.

The Freedom and Captivity lecture series is sponsored by the Departments of American Studies, Anthropology, Art, English and Creative Writing, Music, Philosophy, Sociology, Theater and Dance, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, the African American Studies program, the Oak Institute for Human Rights, Colby Libraries, and the Cultural Events Committee.

The Torture Letters: Reckoning with Police Violence

October 6, 2021

The Torture Letters: Reckoning with Police Violence
Laurence Ralph, Professor of Anthropology at Princeton University
7:00 p.m., Ostrove Auditorium

Laurence Ralph is a Professor of Anthropology at Princeton University. His research and writing explore how police abuse, mass incarceration, and the criminalization of the drug trade naturalize disease, disability, and premature death for urban residents of color, who are often seen as expendable by “polite” society. Theoretically, his research lies at the nexus of critical medical and political anthropology, African American studies, and emerging scholarship on disability. Combining these literatures, he shows show violence and injury play a central role in the daily lives of Black urban populations. His most recent book, Torture Letters, is about torture as an open secret in Chicago. Between 1972 and 1991, at least 125 black suspects were tortured by Chicago police officers working under former Police Commander John Burge. For more than fifty years, police officers who took an oath to protect and serve have instead beaten, electrocuted, suffocated, and raped hundreds—perhaps thousands—of Chicago residents. The Torture Letters chronicles the history of torture in Chicago, the burgeoning activist movement against police violence, and the American public’s complicity in perpetuating torture at home and abroad.

Cosponsored with the Oak Institute for Human Rights.

Snowpiercer

October 5, 2021

Snowpiercer (2013) with Seth Kim, Colby Cinema Studies
Cinema in Conversation: Films of Freedom, Captivity, and Human Rights
7:00 p.m., Maine Film Center

A post-apocalyptic ice age forces humanity’s last survivors aboard a globe-spanning supertrain. One man (Chris Evans) will risk everything to lead a revolt for control of the engine and the future of the world. A film that’s “just as interested in examining topics like climate change, class, and cultural disparity as it is in revealing just how the film’s core team navigates a never-stopping hell train to take on the bad guys” – ArsTechnica.

Cosponsored by the Center for the Arts and Humanities, the Oak Institute for Human Rights, Cinema Studies, and the Maine Film Center.

Freedom and Captivity

October 4, 2021

What Does Abolition Sound Like?
Paul Rucker and Robin Kelley
Freedom and Captivity lecture series
7:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

A performance workshop with artist-musician Paul Rucker creating music in response to prompts by Robin D. G. Kelley (History, UCLA, author of Freedom Dreams).

The Freedom and Captivity lecture series is sponsored by the Departments of American Studies, Anthropology, Art, English and Creative Writing, Music, Philosophy, Sociology, Theater and Dance, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, the African American Studies program, the Oak Institute for Human Rights, Colby Libraries, and the Cultural Events Committee.

The Freedom and Captivity lecture series is sponsored by the Departments of American Studies, Anthropology, Art, English and Creative Writing, Music, Philosophy, Sociology, Theater and Dance, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, the African American Studies program, the Oak Institute for Human Rights, Colby Libraries, and the Cultural Events Committee.

Freedom and Captivity

September 27, 2021

What Does Abolition Feel Like?
Anna Martine Whitehead
Freedom and Captivity lecture series
7:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

Performance artist Anna Martine Whitehead discusses her artistic practice, focused on how she centers Black liberation, queer livingness, and creative alternatives to policing and prisons in her work. An artist talk will be followed by a conversation between Whitehead and performer and poet, Gabrielle Civil. Introduced by Gwyneth Shanks (Theater and Dance).

The Freedom and Captivity lecture series is sponsored by the Departments of American Studies, Anthropology, Art, English and Creative Writing, Music, Philosophy, Sociology, Theater and Dance, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, the African American Studies program, the Oak Institute for Human Rights, Colby Libraries, and the Cultural Events Committee.

Freedom and Captivity

September 21, 2021

September 21, 2021
Two Cent Talk Series: Phuc Tran and Kristen Case
5:00-6:30 p.m., Arts Collaborative, 62 Main Street

Phuc Tran has been a high school Latin teacher for more than twenty years while also simultaneously establishing himself as a highly sought-after tattooer in the Northeast. Tran graduated from Bard College in 1995 with a BA in Classics and received the Callanan Classics Prize. He taught Latin, Greek, and Sanskrit in New York at the Collegiate School and was an instructor at Brooklyn College’s Summer Latin Institute. Most recently, he taught Latin, Greek, and German at the Waynflete School in Portland, Maine.

Kristen Case teaches courses in American literature, environmental writing, and the intersection of 20th- and 21st-century American literature and philosophy. She has published essays on Henry David Thoreau, Robert Frost, Ezra Pound, Wallace Stevens, and William James, and is the author of the book American Poetry and Poetic Practice: Crosscurrents from Emerson to Susan Howe (Camden House, 2011). She is co-editor of the volumes Thoreau at 200: Essays and Reassessments (Cambridge UP, 2016) and 21|19: Contemporary Poets in the 19th Century Archive (Milkweed Editions, 2019).

Sponsored by Colby College’s Office of the President, Center for the Arts and the Humanities, English Department, and Creative Writing Program.

Freedom and Captivity

September 20, 2021

September 20, 2021
Abolition for the 21st Century
Orisanmi Burton, Dylan Rodriguez and Jackie Wang
Freedom and Captivity lecture series
7:00 p.m., Live Zoom Webinar

Join us for Abolition for the 21st Century’ with Orisanmi Burton (Anthropology, American University, Abolition 101 video), Dylan Rodriguez (American Studies, UC-Riverside, founding member of Critical Resistance and author of Forced Passages: Imprisoned Radical Intellectuals and the U.S. Prison Regime) and Jackie Wang (USC).

To register for the event, please click here.

 The Freedom and Captivity lecture series is sponsored by the Departments of American Studies, Anthropology, Art, English and Creative Writing, Music, Philosophy, Sociology, Theater and Dance, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, the African American Studies program, the Oak Institute for Human Rights, Colby Libraries, and the Cultural Events Committee.

Jacinta

September 14, 2021

Jacinta (2020) w/ director Jessica Earshaw and subject Jacinta Hunt
Cinema in Conversation: Films of Freedom, Captivity, and Human Rights
7:00 p.m., Maine Film Center

A deeply intimate portrait of mothers and daughters and the effects of trauma, JACINTA follows a young woman in and out of prison as she attempts to break free from an inherited cycle of addiction, incarceration, and crime.

Cosponsored by the Center for the Arts and Humanities, Oak Institute for Human Rights, Cinema Studies, and the Maine Film Center.

Part of Freedom & Captivity, a statewide initiative to explore an abolitionist future for Maine.